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20130117
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from connecticut gave a detailed account of the sandy hook shooting last month. also testifying, philadelphia mayor michael nutter, the mother of the victim of the arizonan shooting two years ago and police chief from minnesota. >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much for joining us on this very solemn and important occasion for the american people. just over a month ago our nation was shocked and horrified by the news of the shooting at sandy hook elementary school in newtown connecticut. 20 children and six educators were taken from us at gunpoint. an act of senseless incomprehensible violence struck at the heart of our families and schools and communities across the country. earlier this month, shortly after newtown, all members of congress to get both to protect and defend the constitution and the american people. to protect and defend, that is our first responsibility to read today leaders of the house democratic caucus have come together to fulfill that duty to confront the challenge of some violence in our society to enact and insure the safety and security of ou
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildren. we have a spirit of innovation here in washington that has changed the world, from aerospace to software to e-commerce. and you know what? we are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things. first, with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. second, the world will not wait for us.
to come in and settle themselves down. super storm sandy, drought on agriculture, wildfires, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear reactor accident in japan last year, haiti earthquake, the list is long and worrying. in 20 # 11, we had more disasters in the united states costing more than a billion dollars than ever. in fact, we had more expensive disasters, but not quite as many in 2012. the drought and the super storm were hugely, hugely expensive. disasters are happening with greater frequency, greater severity, and absolutely with many, many greater costs. we ray -- we are here over the next three days to work across traditional boundaries to connect scientists of all stripes with practitioners, with policymakers from the international to the local level with conservation organizations, with cooperations, and it is our belief that only, and i want to emphasize "only" by working together can we solve these challenges that face us. the costs are the just not financial, but as we tragically know, many, many lives are lost in these disasters so if we can come up with just one
department for the extraordinary performance during and after superstorm sandy. what a sea change, no pun intended, from the response to katrina. before engaging in a conversation let me say word about one of the person who is supposed to be here. i'm not sure that she is here. is terry here? yes. i want to make a special shout out, whose mother was killed on 9/11, and whose voice and courage have inspired congress and me, and the executive branch, both in the bush administration and the obama administration, to act. she is the director of the bipartisan policy center's homeland security project, and her movie, killing in the name, did an extraordinary amount to expose the fact that much of al qaeda's poor is against in a sense muslims. there's lots of big shots and mission, and one of them, a great favorite of mine, bill webster just walked in, but weighing in at 100 pounds, carrie may actually be the heavyweight. so welcome, carrie. welcome to all of you, and welcome to janet napolitano. [applause] >> are you embarrassed? oh, good. that was my intention. okay, madam secretary, let's sta
try to spend their money in a wiser, built-to-last kind of way. that's what the sandy supplemental allows. it also allows the state to draw down a portion of its hazard mitigation funding from fema in order to leverage mitigation opportunities earlier in the construction process. in the old days, it would take 18-36 months for funding to become available in some instances to rebuild a school. that's too long. can you imagine a community going three years, you know, without even getting their school started? i mean, i realize that sometimes it takes a long time to build things, but you don't want to just wait three years before you start. so the way that we do it now without spending any more money, it's just allowing them to -- the federal government to push out some of the front money to the locals, they can then get started and of course they will reimburse the federal government. so that is a very smart reform that's in there. in addition, we also provide grants on the basis of a reliable fixed estimate for expedited removal of storm debris. this approach will be faster, cheaper
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6